Yokohama

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Yokohama-shi, Naka-ku, Yamashita-cho 276, Hamada-Bldg 1F

MARCH 2020: Minton House is closing its doors this month, possibly relocating in Yokohama though that’s not settled yet. Visit while you still can!

Minton House celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2015 and shows no sign of closing any time soon. It’s located just a few minutes walk from JR Ishikawacho Station in Yokohama right on the edge of Chinatown, and is a well known watering hole for both musicians and fans.

It is a long, narrow space with walls covered in old photos, paintings and flyers. Master Kawakami-san is a genial and mellow host who keeps the music flowing from his large collection of vinyl behind the bar on the left as you walk in. You’re likely to hear almost anything as last time I was in he played in order Grant Green, Jack DeJohnette, Pat Metheny, some female vocalist whose name I didn’t get, Eric Dolphy and then some big-band swing. Everything sounded great on the huge speakers at the back of the room. One way I always judge jazz joints is how easy it is to ‘lose time’ while sitting in there; many times at Minton House I’ve planned to pop in for a drink or two and ended up leaving four hours later.

Minton House opens at 5pm most days so is perfect for either an early drink or a post-Chinatown meal nightcap. It’s likely the best jazz bar in Yokohama, let’s hope it sticks around another 40 years.  See pictures of Minton House over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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Japan, 〒231-0023 Kanagawa-ken, Yokohama-shi, Naka-ku, Yamashitachō, 巴里堂ビル

Marshmallow is a lovely new(ish) cafe located right in the heart of Chinatown, in Yokohama. It was opened 2+ years ago by Mr. & Mrs Joufu, long time Yokohama residents and previously owners of a men’s clothing shop, but also the purveyors of the Marshmallow Jazz record label in Japan. Marshmallow Records has over the last 40 years recorded numerous jazz musicians such as Chet Baker and Duke Jordan at sessions both in Japan and around the world. (Scroll down the main web page to see the full list of releases.)

Joufu-san closed his men’s clothing store in 2015 and opened the cafe on the second floor of a building on West Gate Street in Chinatown, just seconds away from where he was born 70 years ago. The cafe is long rectangular shape, with several dozen gorgeous jazz musician portraits and calendars covering almost all the wall space. There is a mixture of vinyl and CDs from his personal collection, including Marshmallow releases of course. However there are frequent afternoons set aside for customers to bring in their own records and put them on. There are also periodic afternoon or evening listening sessions devoted to one artist, hosted by various fan clubs.

Joufu-san speaks English and is happy to chat about his label and about the jazz scene around Japan so don’t hesitate to pop in for a coffee if you’re in Chinatown; Marshmallow is perfect spot for a 90-min or so rest stop during a Yokohama day out. Open from 1-8pm, closed Mondays & Tuesdays.

More pics of Marshmallow at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

 

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231-0033 横浜市中区長者町 9-140

First is an old-school Yokohama jazz bar with a vibe and sound all its own. It’s more spacious than your average jazz joint in the Tokyo Metro Area, with room for about 30-35 customers, and space in front for live sets. There’s a baby grand piano in the corner right as you enter and a drum set to the right before you get to the tables and long counter bar along the left wall.

Mr. & Mrs. Yamazaki have been running First for more than thirty years and the bar itself dates back to 1968. It’s a bit dark and the magazines in the back corner are way out of date, but the regular customers are not just old, solitary jazz fans; First is happy to host small drinking parties and doesn’t mind even when they get a bit rowdy, though I prefer it when people are alone and concentrating on the music.

The vinyl selection is all modern jazz (some superb Joe Henderson was playing on my last visit) with a slant towards more ‘moody’ records, making it always feel like midnight in First even when you’re there in the late afternoon.  First used to have about one live gig a week but recently have increased to about two or three per week. Thankfully, the live gigs seem to include a variety of styles and not just the usual vocal quartet/quintets you get at a lot of other places; check the website for the schedule before stopping by.

First is one of my favorite places to stop by in Yokohama, an all around great jazz joint. Check more pics here at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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Miyamoto Bldg, 2F 1-43 Hanasakicho, Naka-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Downbeat in Yokohama is one of the classic jazz spots in the entire Kanto (Tokyo Metropolitan) area. It first opened in 1956 and is now on its third owner, then young and friendly Yoshihisa-san who took over the joint in April 2017. (He assured me he’s keeping the place as is, and even adding to the 3700+ jazz records already behind the counter.)

DB is a hardcore cafe/bar where the music comes first; the volume is loud and in your face, making conversation difficult if not impossible in the main area by the speakers on the left, though the seats on the right side by the bar counter are a bit removed and thus quieter. (The bar seats are also non-smoking)  The music selections are varied; you’ll hear anything from classic swing to Pharoah Sanders and all in between.

It’s kind of difficult to capture in words the vibe of such a classic old Japanese jazz joint, with the faded posters and dark lighting. Check the pictures here for a taste, but be sure to visit there at least once. It’s a treasure for jazz fans and a place that captures the old time port style of Yokohama.

DB is in the historical port side block neighborhood of Noge, across from the main Sakuragicho-station front plaza. Lots of little drinking dens, old karaoke pubs and some other jazz joints to visit around here if you have a night.

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2F Dai Ichi Nishimura Bldg. 2F, 2-17-4 Miyagawa-cho, Naka-Ku

Jazz Spot Dolphy opened in 1980 but moved to its current location in 1990 and has kept up a steady live schedule since then. It’s a small, square space that seats about 50 people, most seats facing the stage.

The music can vary with everything from extreme free jazz to vocal-led standards groups. Pianist Itabashi Fumio is a regular (I was told the piano usually needs repairs after one of his energetic performances..) Jam sessions and student led jams happen a couple times a month, and the whole room is available for private events. Occasionally owner Komuro-san even joins in with his own gigs as does manager-vocalist Sachiko-san. Very friendly atmosphere with an extensive drinks menu, it’s an all-around great jazz joint.

Dolphy gets extra points as well for staying open late so you can pop in for a drink after the live sets have finished about 10pm. Look out for the really nice portrait of Thelonious Monk on the wall next to the bathroom door. More pics of Dolphy here at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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2-94 Noge-cho Naka-ku, Yokohama,Kanagawa 231-0064

Chigusa is the the gold standard of jazz cafes in Japan. It was first opened in 1933 in the rough, portside streets of Noge in Yokohama by Mamoru Yoshida (1913-1994). The history of Chigusa is a long and fascinating one, you can read about in English in this Japan Times article, or in Japanese on the home page.

The current Chigusa is a small, square room with all seats facing the enormous speakers set in front of the back wall. There are hand drawn portraits and photos on the walls from Yoshida-san’s personal collection, and a small gallery space exhibiting more from through the years.  The music in Chigusa ranges from old-time swing to modern, experimental jazz, almost all on vinyl. They welcome requests as well so have a long look at the record ‘menu’ they offer and write down what you’d like to hear. The volume is crisp and loud; don’t come to Chigusa to have a lengthy conversation, this is a place to listen to great music.  We’re lucky to still have it with us.  Photos of Chigusa at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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3-152-1 Nishi-Kanagawa, Kanagawa-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Bitches Brew is yet another only-in-Japan kind of place. It’s a tiny sqaure room on the second floor of a building in the fairly residential area of Hakuraku, north Yokohama. There is live music every night, but as there is no stage, the lack of space means the audience is an active part of the gig. You are literally right next to the musicians as they play.

BB was opened 10 years ago by the chatty & friendly Seiichi Sugita. Sugita-san had a long career as a photo-journalist, shooting some of the biggest jazz names at festivals in the US and Europe. He’s also quite the audiophile and has a vacuum-tube system in the place for music in between live sets. (Audiophiles can read about all his equipment up on his homepage.)

Sigita-san takes pride in putting on live shows every night with musicians who make the trek down from Tokyo just to perform there. I was stunned to hear that free-jazz legend Akira Sakata plays there regularly; imagine the power of hearing someone like him in such a small room.  Bitches Brew is place for real music heads, and it’s well worth the trip to Hakuraku to check out a show there.  Photos of Bitches Brew over at Tokyo Jazz Joints

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3-9 Yoshida-cho, Naka-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Little John is a well known jazz bar/tiny club in the Yokohama scene, yet its erratic opening hours can make it tough to visit. It’s a small rectangular room with about 15 seats and a back wall ‘stage’, another 6 or so seats at the back counter bar.  There’s live music often but not nightly so you can drop by for a drink after 7 most days. It also takes part in most of the local Yokohama-based jazz events/weekends based on the posters hung around the room.

Even after finally entering the joint for the first time (for a gig as part of the 2015 Yokohama Jazz Promenade) Little John remains a bit of a mystery. Master Furukawa-san is friendly and chatty, but not the actual owner. He didn’t really share the whole story with me but from what I gathered the owner is kind of ill and doesn’t come by much, leaving it in the hands of Furukawa-san. He assured me he’s there daily at 7 but several times I’ve been by and they were closed..the story seems incomplete, I’ll keep investigating.

Regardless, Little John has that dark, divey old school jazz bar feel to it that many customers will enjoy, a place to run into to escape from a cold rainy night. You can easily make a night of it in Yoshida-cho visiting Little John, Jazz Ad-lib, Rock Bar Sid and some of the other music bars along those back streets.

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3-11 Yoshidamachi, Naka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken 231-0041, Japan

Ad-Lib is an old club in Yoshida-cho, a block of dingy streets between Kannai and Noge in Yokohama. Live music nightly with Saturday afternoon cafe/record listening time. It’s a no-frills jazz & whiskey joint, down to earth and authentic.

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Hanasaki-cho 1-16-1, Naka-ku, Yokohama-Shi

Jazz House Five Star Records is a unique little place in the Noge neighborhood, next to Sakuragicho station in Yokohama. This is an area that still has some of the rough and tumble vibe of old Yokohama, a place packed with small drinking dens and several jazz bars. I cam across FSR by chance while wandering around Noge one Saturday afternoon.

FSR is an independent record label run by Mitsukoshi Yoshie-san, a 50ish lady who speaks a mile a minute and knows the entire history of jazz in Yokohama. Before I could finish my coffee I had pages of notes with details about the area and all the bar owners, as well as the “Yokohama Jazz Association” (横浜ジャズ協会) that puts on various events around town.

The small building has a studio up top where brothers Pat and Joe La Barbera and have recently recorded CDs while in Japan (Mitsukoshi-san kindly gave me free copies, they’re great.) The first floor bar/cafe seats about 12 people and there’s room for monthly live events alongside occasional CD release parties. There’s the usual coffee and tea plus alcohol, and a book shelf with magazines and jazz guides customers can flip through while drinking.

FSR should be one of your first stops on a Yokohama jazz night; the community is lucky to have Mitsukoshi-san around to keep things vibrant.

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Suehiro-Cho 2-5, Naka-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Yoidore Hakushaku (よいどれ伯爵-the name translates as “The Drunken Earl or The Drunken Count”, take your pick. Locals just call it “Yoidore”) is classic old basement joint in jazzy Kannai, Yokohama. It’s got a very vintage sense of style..I was reminded of my old neighbor Mrs. Bodenheimer’s s apartment in Brooklyn, which will make sense to some of you..Soft sofas around the room along side a bar, with the musicians up against the back wall. Owner Sato-san is usually behind the bar and up for a chat between sets, keeping the vibe very friendly (not always the case in live venues..)

It’s vocal groups almost every night at Yoidore; don’t go here expecting to hear any Pharoah Sanders covers. It’s great value for the usual 3000 yen entry as there are three sets nightly from 7:30. 10 bonus points for serving Guinness!

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Sumiyoshi-cho 6-7-6, Naka-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Kamome means “seagull” in Japanese; it’s an apt name for a venue in the port town of Yokohama. It’s a great new-ish restaurant club in the historic but recently downtrodden Kannai neighborhood, not far from Chinatown or the baseball stadium. There’s live music every night with a really eclectic mix of styles..be sure to check the schedule (and have a Japanese reading friend confirm the genre of the evening) before going. The food is very good here and all the seats face the stage for the most part. The gigs usually end about 10pm so Kamome is a good first stop on a jazz-hopping evening in Kannai.

A reminder: there is no smoking inside many (not all) establishments in Kanagawa prefecture, to which Yokohama belongs. Certain bars still allow it but many places with food do not.

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Hakuraku 100, Yokohama-shi
045-421-1550045-421-1550

Sadly, 10×10 closed in 2014. A neighboring cafe owner told me that Takeyama-san closed the shop to take care of her grandchildren..I hope they appreciate her Max Roach records.

Hakuraku (白楽) 10×10 is a hidden gem of a cafe. It’s in a residential part of Yokohama city (but only about 25 mins from Shibuya in Tokyo, on the Tokyu Toyoko Line) yet has regular live events at night. The lovely Takeyama-san has been the owner for the past 40 years. She’s one of the world’s top Max Roach collectors; there are portraits and photos of the great drummer/composer all around the cafe, all drawn by the wonderfully named “Asobi-nin no Kin-san” (遊び人のKINSAN)

I only visited 10×10 a few times but Takeyama-san always treated me like an honored guest. When I left last time she gave me a copy of Kin-san’s book of essays and drawings about life and jazz as a present, proving yet again that jazz cafe & bar owners are generally among the kindest people you will ever meet. 10×10 is worth the trip out on the Tokyoko Line; after the cafe you can stroll along Hakuraku’s famous old-town shopping street, and maybe grab a meal at the legendary TanTan Ramen shop.

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