Serving Food

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6-13-9 Minami Aoyama, Minato-Ku

Body & Soul is one of the most historically important jazz clubs in Tokyo. Featuring many of the top local musicians but also regular groups from the US and Europe, B&S is along with the Pit Inn and Alfie one of the three most famous live spots in town. Owner Ms. Seki Kyoko is a major figure in the jazz scene for more than 50 years, knowing everyone in the jazz world here and overseas. (Visiting American jazz musicians will often stop by Body & Soul just to pay their respects, even if they are playing at another club.)

Different styles depending on the night (mostly mainstream, with a few more adventurous groups on occasion) and always packed, B&S is also the rare jazz joint with exceptionally good food, so you can plan on dinner & drinks along with the gig.

Unfortunately after 30+ years at their Omotesando location, Body & Soul is moving to a new space in Shibuya, right up the street from Tower Records, with the first gig scheduled for October 10th, 2021.  Details coming soon on the new venue!

 

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Hama Roppongi Bldg. 5F, 6-2-35 Roppongi, Minato-Ku
Opened in May 1980 and now in its 41st year, Alfie is simply one of the best live jazz spots in Japan. Located in the busy nightlife area (though not a big jazz neighborhood) of Roppongi, Alfie was run by drummer Hino Motohiko and his wife Yoko. Hino was a major figure in the J Jazz community, often playing with his trumpet playing brother Terumasa as well as visiting jazz musicians from America. Hino sadly passed away in 1999 but Alfie is still run by Yoko, with top quality live jazz nightly.
There are lot of different types of jazz featured at Alfie, mostly local acts with the occasional visiting musician from overseas. Popular trumpeter TOKU is a regular each month as is pianist Yoshizawa Hajime, but also keep a look out for special weekend ‘party’ type events.
Alfie is also one of the few jazz spots to stay open for drinks after the gigs end, so if you’re out past midnight you can still drop by for a few drinks. It’s a warm space, and though it may be considered small by guests from outside Japan, Alfie doesn’t feel suffocating the way many Japanese clubs can. It should be on any list of top five Tokyo jazz clubs.
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2 Chome−1−10, Kanda Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku

Naru in Ochanomizu first opened in 1969 as the sister live spot to the Naru jazz cafe in the Yoyogi neighborhood, and remains a popular live spot after 50 years for the high quality of local musicians that appear nightly, both Japanese and other nationalities.  It’s a small, dinner-club type of jazz club and the food is actually very good at Naru so it’s worth stopping by at lunchtime just to eat and listen to some records. The chef is from Madagascar and cooks up a range of dishes, mainly Italian but the menu changes often.

Owned by sax-player Ishizaki Shinobu, the lineup features some of Tokyo’s best gigging jazz musicians hosting monthly gigs, with the occasional one-off shows as well. There is no stage and the tables are all very close together, some close enough to touch the grand piano along the back wall. (Like many Tokyo jazz establishments, some overseas customers may find the room slightly claustrophobic). But this greatly adds to the intimacy, and listening to a band grooving so close to your table is an unbeatable experience.

Naru is one of the best no-nonsense live clubs in town for jazz that’s not too light, but won’t scare away those customers who can’t handle free/more experimental jazz styles. A bargain too at only ¥2500 (US$ 22) plus drink charges for all three sets.

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Hashi no Shita (橋 の下 means “Under The Bridge” in Japanese) is in Akasaka-Mitsuke on the main road outside the subway station, a long row filled with hostess bars and restaurants. Open as an afternoon “cafe” and evening “bar” they serve a lot of food and is particularly popular with the neighborhood business people for lunch.

They used to have small live sets of duos and trios with no table charge, but that doesn’t seem to happen much any more.  It’s open till 4am so it’s a good spot to remember if you miss your train and need some jazz to get you through the night. Be sure to check out the wall of vinyl album covers.

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Chome 34-8, Shinjuku-ku, Shinjuku

Someday is a nice, spacious club in Shinjuku, well known for their various big band and Latin jazz nights. Plenty of foreign musicians on the roster as well as local acts, a fairly good food menu and you only pay one entry fee for both sets. Great place for some live tunes before doing some late night jazz bar hopping in Golden Gai or Shinjuku San-Chome neighborhoods. Extra bonus points for the ‘classic’ website that has a lot of friendly English on it.

Jingumae, 3 Chome−5−2

Gekko Sabou (月光茶房 “moon-light-tea-chamber”, a wonderful name) is not a jazz cafe/bar in the traditional sense, advertising itself as featuring “jazz, free music, improvised music, tribal & trad music, voice and singing”.

It is a small place with only ten seats at a long counter. It has been through several changes in design and outlook since it opened and now functions as a coffee and tea specialty cafe. The menu for both is extensive, but you have to read Japanese.

The room is sleek, modern and dark with a really nice collection of tea and coffee sets above the bar, and framed record sleeves all along the back wall. Owner Harada-san and a regular customer were in the process of changing the albums when I was there, with the new batch consisting entirely of French records. I didn’t catch the name of what was playing at the time but it was some really minimal, improvised electronic music which fit the atmosphere perfectly. Gekkou Sabou is a beautiful, contemporary update on the classic jazz kissaten, a quiet place, good for either an afternoon tea or a beer at night.

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Minami Karasuyama 5-17-13 3F, Setagaya-Ku

Ragtime is the ideal jazz cafe in many ways. It’s a small place up on the 3rd floor of a rustic building right next to Chitose-Karasuyama station on the Keio Line, a residential part of the western outskirts of Tokyo. A small square room with about 20 seats, the feeling is cozy and inviting, the wooden walls and tables making it feel like home. There are pencils and strips of paper on each table for customer requests, always a sign of good vibes. They say only one per customer but when I went there as a many years back, spending 3 hours “studying” in the place, they took all my repeated requests. All genres represented and mostly vinyl behind the counter, of course.

On my last visit there were a couple of locals chatting at the counter seats, while the master put on a nice mix of tunes including Tal Farlow, Wynton Kelly and Joao Gilberto. Failry mellow sounds but suitable for a quiet afternoon coffee.

Ragtime is open from 3pm to 2am every day, making it perfect for either an afternoon pit stop or for drinks on your way home. Only in Japan can you find such wonderful jazz cafes in a random western outskirt. Photos of Ragtime now up at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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Inaba Bldg , 2F Asagaya-Minami 3-28-31
03-3220-127503-3220-1275

吐夢 (Pronounced “To-mu” or just “Tom”) is unique in a couple of ways. Its got two rooms with large tables in both along with one long counter; they cook up a lot of fairly good food (rare to get tasty grub in jazz joints); there are about a hundred signed baseballs up on the top shelf above the bar, right over about 3000+ albums; it has a very spacious vibe that you don’t get at most jazz bars in the center of Tokyo.

吐夢 has been in Asagaya for more than forty years and is well known by most locals. The music almost always fits the mood; when it’s quiet and fairly empty you get some slow burning blues or hard-bop. When it’s packed and noisy you get some hard-swinging soul-jazz or even big band. It’s a good place for larger groups who want to drink a bit but still get to hear some swinging tunes. One of my favorite of many great jazz bars along the JR Chuo railway line.

Extra star for having a special 400 yen happy hour for glasses of Ebisu draft beer. Bargain for a jazz bar. See more pics of Tom over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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Marco Polo Bldg 2F, 1-8-14 Hon-Chi, Kichijoji

Scratch is a quiet cafe/bar that’s been in heart of Kichijoji since 1974. They open during the day for cafe time and have an extensive food and drink menu with over 100 cocktails, many of them with jazz related names like the “Bill Evans Waltz for Debby”, a strawberry and walnut cream daiquiri looking thing.

The vibe is mellow and dark, with the huge main window looking out across at John Henry’s bar across the alley separating Scratch’s building and the huge LOFT department store building. Along one wall of the room are a whole bunch of album covers , anything from Miles to Mingus, but most of the music they play is on the “cool” side…last time I was there Julie London and Sarah Vaughn albums were playing, very mellow but nice.

Scratch is a good place for some solo jazz cafe/bar time, just you, a book and some tunes. Scratch also wins points for having the greatest bar slogan of all time: “Coffee & Bourbon, Music Now, You meet the nice people in Scratch”. See more pics of Scratch over at Tokyo Jazz Joints. Not recommended if you have an aversion to cigarette smoke.

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2F Dai Ichi Nishimura Bldg. 2F, 2-17-4 Miyagawa-cho, Naka-Ku

Jazz Spot Dolphy opened in 1980 but moved to its current location in 1990 and has kept up a steady live schedule since then. It’s a small, square space that seats about 50 people, most seats facing the stage.

The music can vary with everything from extreme free jazz to vocal-led standards groups. Pianist Itabashi Fumio is a regular (I was told the piano usually needs repairs after one of his energetic performances..) Jam sessions and student led jams happen a couple times a month, and the whole room is available for private events. Occasionally owner Komuro-san even joins in with his own gigs as does manager-vocalist Sachiko-san. Very friendly atmosphere with an extensive drinks menu, it’s an all-around great jazz joint.

Dolphy gets extra points as well for staying open late so you can pop in for a drink after the live sets have finished about 10pm. Look out for the really nice portrait of Thelonious Monk on the wall next to the bathroom door. More pics of Dolphy here at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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スズノビル1F, 3 Chome-2-10 Honchō, Nakano-ku
03-3372-347103-3372-3471

Genius was one of Shibuya’s more famous jazz cafes for more than 20 years before increasing rents pushed them out, necessitating a move to sleepy Nakano-Shinbashi, a bit west of Shinjuku.

It is owned and operated by the lovely Suzuki-family, a warm and chatty couple with many jazz stories in their past. The cafe is filled with beautiful black & white photos taken at gigs over the years, as well as a substantial collection of Japanese jazz magazines and journals. The main attraction at Genius though is the huge record collection; Suzuki-san humbly claimed it was only ‘a couple thousand, with some more at home’ but there’s certainly more than that. By my eye test I’d guess 5000+, and word from some customers is that they have another 5000 at home, rotating what they bring to the cafe. When I was last there he pulled out an amazing John Coltrane in Europe bootleg featuring Eric Dolphy, an absolute treasure.

The sound system is pristine and there is tasty cake and coffee on the menu, plus the usual alcohol options. Genius is yet another perfect spot to spend an afternoon listening to jazz.  Pictures of Genius are over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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Bunkyo-Ku, Hakusan 5-33-19

The Eigakan (映画館 “Movie Theater) is a jazz cafe for both jazz lovers and cinephiles. Owner Yoshida-san has worked in the film world for several decades and made several documentaries. He has filled the Eigakan with vintage European film posters from the 60s and hundreds of old film journals and magazines. (Be sure to ask him to show you the three-volume photo book by Takase Susumu, the pics of old movie palaces around Japan in the 50s & 60s were amazing.)

Yoshida-san opened the place “sometime in the late 70s” (he couldn’t remember the exact date) and said the name comes from when he and some film friends first found the space for a showing of Imamura Shohei’s film “Pigs and Battleships”. It slowly transformed into a jazz cafe and now has only the rare film showing.. I’m tempted to ask him to pull down some of the dusty 16mm film cans he has on the shelves to get some film events started again..

Yoshida-san is a huge Thelonious Monk and Eric Dolphy fan and also features a lot of rare Eastern European jazz records in the cafe. He’s very chatty when the place is not busy and will be happy to talk jazz, films and art with you. On my last visit he pulled out a map of the neighborhood to show me two more jazz spots I had not heard of..guys with the warm heart of Yoshida-san really do make the world a better place. Viva Eigakan. Photos of Eigakan over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

Open from 1600 most days.

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Musashino, Kichijoji Honcho, 1−11−31

SOMETIME Kichijoji (they use all caps..) opened in 1975 and still packs people in every night of the week. As the name says it’s in Kichijoji, an area in Western Tokyo that has long been known for being a jazz ‘town’, though there are fewer joints now than there were in the golden days of the 60s and 70s.

SOMETIME though is without a doubt the center of the Kichijoji jazz community, a great place to dive into the local scene. There are usually different Japanese musicians playing every night, all genres featured. The official name ‘Piano Hall SOMETIME’ refers more to the look of the place rather than about the music. The big black grand piano does dominate the center of the room (there is no stage), but it’s not at all a ‘piano bar’. Customers sit at the counter around the open-space, or look down on the musicians from seats in the loft.

There’s a real speakeasy feel to the place when it’s full and the musicians are out on the floor tearing it up. Even better for the poorer/cheaper jazz fan is the live charge. Gigs can be as cheap as ¥1600, and that covers you for all the sets in the evening (unlike many big-name chain clubs.) SOMETIME is a great place to kick off a night in Kichijoji, and I’d recommend the Sunday afternoon lunch sessions or even just cafe time as well. Photos of SOMETIME over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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1-11 Kanda-Jimbocho, Chiyoda

Big Boy is a tiny cafe/bar on a side street off the main road through Jinbocho, the old book shop area of Tokyo. It was opened ten years ago by ex-advertising man Hayashi-san, a very serious jazz collector. He right away started telling us about his large collection, as well as the names of other jazz cafes all around Japan. We immediately felt at home with the warm welcome by Hayashi-san and his wife.

The space is a small one, seating maybe a max of about 15 people. Hayashi-san has taken great care with his audio system and as a result, the sound in Big Boy is incredible. (Details on his web page about all the equipment.) There’s a vast amount of vinyl along with CDs behind the bar, all genres though Hayashi-san points out that unlike a lot of other jazz cafes, he plays a lot of contemporary jazz from Europe. There was a new CD by a Polish piano trio playing when I last visited, very swinging.

Big Boy isn’t the kind of place to go if you want to have an extended chat; the music is loud and the sound system so crisp, you’ll want to just sit back and enjoy the music. Open until 5pm as a cafe, then from 7pm as a bar. Take note: ¥1000 table charge at night. Photos of Big Boy over at Tokyo Jazz Joints

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Fuji Shoji Bldg. 2F, Sakuragaoka 2-3, Shibuya-Ku

Many years back I found  Mary Jane by accident, as I had been  looking for the wonderfully named ‘Hardbop Cafe’ (sadly now closed). Discovering MJ has been open for 40+ years and that it has its own distinct rustic vibe was a nice consolation prize.

MJ serves food all day, unusual for a jazz kissaten, and the owner Matsuo-san seems to really like Scandanavian jazz so you`ll hear a lot of the Nordic ECM label players here. I asked why it was called Mary Jane and he said ‘it’s just a name’ with no smirk or wink, so I don’t think it’s a marijuana reference. (Matsuo-san is not the original owner however so he may not know.)

The room is square shaped with many flyers and jazz books spread around, a very relaxing space for coffee and the tasty cheese cake on the menu. It’s very near Shibuya station but on the much quieter South Exit side away from the manic crowds of shoppers, meaning it’s a good place for a pit stop if you’re stuck in Shibuya.

Check the web page for his current, extensive playlist of new cds.

Pics of Mary Jane over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

 

1-8 Yotsuya, Shinjuku-Ku

Eagle is really the prototypical jazz cafe. It opened in 1967 in Yotsuya, right down the street from Sofia University, so four decades worth of college students have passed through the place along with the usual sleepy afternoon salarymen and jazz freaks. Its got all the usual jazz cafe bits (magazine reading material, fliers, expensive coffee) and a massive record collection. In the afternoons they put up a sign on the door announcing a ‘No Talking’ policy, keeping the focus on the music.

Last time I was there I got lucky as they played Grant Green’s”Matador” album on Blue Note, then Eric Dolphy`s “Live at the Five Spot” with Booker Little on trumpet. These sounded like completely different records to the ones I play at home on my tiny system. The music in the Eagle is kept loud and the sound system is crystal clear, so hearing old records in there is a whole new experience. It’s completely worth blowing off work for the afternoon to spend a few hours in there immersed in classic jazz records. The interior of Eagle has been redone so it doesn’t feel as old and atmospheric as some other cafes, but still has a place near the top of any Tokyo jazz joint list.

See photos of Eagle over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

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Owl
Toshima-Ku, Higashi-Ikebukuro 1-28-1 Takuto T.O. Bldg 2F

The Owl cafe in Ikebukuro was a great mystery to me as the first three times I went by it was closed, but a recent trek up to Ikebukuro on a Friday afternoon was a success as I finally made it inside.

It’s fairly small place with just a few tables and a long counter. Owner Ooshiba-san was welcoming though not particluarly chatty, sitting behind the counter and reading while I checked the out the joint. There is a corner wall unit full of records, CDs and jazz magazines, plus some great old posters on the other walls. The music ranged from vocal/swing to fusion while I was there; he seems to have an all-round collection.

There is the usual beer and whiskey on the menu but the Owl’s specialty is coffee (and the cake sets looked better than the usual jazz cafe snack options). Though the interior of the cafe seems quite old, Ooshiba-san said he’s been open for only 12 years. This was a surprise, it feels like a Showa-era jazz cafe. It closes early at 8pm so don’t go by expecting a long drinking session (it’s also closed on Saturdays).

Located on a dreary street in the shadow of the huge Sunshine City building, the Owl is a perfect spot to escape from the grime of Ikebukuro over coffee and good tunes. You’ll see the sign out on the street next to a Chinese restaurant and the posters lining the stairwell up to the shop.

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Mori Bldg. 5F, 3-35-5, Shinjuku-Ku

Samurai is located in the building that used to house the Shinjuku Pit-Inn before they moved to their current location. When you enter to the left off the elevator you immediately are taken into another era, face to face with a 5-foot manneke-neko (招き猫`lucky cat figurine`). These cat figurines are omnipresent at the entrance to Japanese eateries and shops, beckoning in customers with a raised paw. Inside the Samurai are more than 2500 of these lucky cat figurines spread throughout the interior, hanging from the walls, piled in cabinets, in paintings and in photos. Some frowning, some scowling, some with a serene smile..it’s an awesome site. Hanging on the walls are scrolls of haiku calligraphy, left wing underground theater posters plus some seemingly right-wing nationalist Japanese propoganda..a bewildering mix that adds to the mysterious atmosphere.

In between the cats and the scrolls there are signed album sleeves on the wall, from owner Miyazaki-san`s time in New York in the 1970’s. The music reflects Miyazaki-san’s maverick character; in one visit I heard John Zorn, James Carter, Count Basie, Abdullah Ibrahim and Big John Patton..quite a mix of styles in one sitting, and all glorious. Dark, quiet, extremely peaceful..with the cats making it just a tiny bit unsettling,the Samurai is a place that lends itself to contemplation.

Miyazaki-san is usually there early on Saturday afternoons for “cafe time” but call first. And be sure to look for the postcard on the front door, it will explain the origin of the name “Samurai”..and it’s not what you think..

Tokyo Jazz Joint photos of Samurai can be seen here.

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〒150-0002 東京都渋谷区渋谷2丁目3−4
03-3499-189003-3499-1890

Seabird is a lovely old cafe next to Aoyama Gakuin University, between Shibuya and Omotesando stations. It’s been open for about 30 years and has a very homey vibe, cluttered but cozy. The menu has the old style Japanese cafe ‘morning sets’ (toast & coffee) and a small liquor selection.

The music is a mix of jazz styles but nothing too heavy, with small live/jam sessions on Fridays and Saturdays. Mr. and Mrs Toriumi (‘Tori’鳥 = bird, ‘Umi’ 海 = sea) are super friendly and generous (they invited me to join them for dinner in the cafe last time I dropped by) making Seabird the kind of place you want to be a regular at. Amongst all the over-priced, soulless cafes of Omotesando, Seabird really stands out for its warmth and authenticity.

Note: there are two entrances to Seabird.

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102 Dai-Ichi Mitomi Bldg 102, 1-30-6 Arai, Nakano-Ku

Rompercicci is a fairly new jazz cafe/bar just a short ten-minute walk from Nakano Station. It’s a bright, warm space with superb speakers and an extensive vinyl collection covering all genres. Looks like some nice cakes available for afternoon coffee/tea time plus wine, whisky and beer for night time drinking.  It’d be nice to have an addition to the Tokyo jazz cafe scene rather than the usual subtraction as more and more places close down No smoking joint, which will appeal to a lot of people. Video below.

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New Gold Bldg, 2F, 3-6-10 Shinjuku-Ku

Houdenasu (ほうでなす) is a small 2nd floor bar located right in the heart of Shinjuku 3-Chome, a neighborhood packed with great music bars and places to eat. Opened 16 years ago by master Satodate-san, it’s an intimate, no frills jazz bar with mostly regular customers. There are periodic 2 or 3 piece live shows, mostly standard type stuff. Satodate-san has a nice collection of CDs and vinyl; I was pleased to see an original Hank Mobley album hanging behind the bar.

Satodate-san was a pleasure to chat music with and he invited me back anytime to check out one of the live shows and talk with some of the regulars. Houdenasu is a another great spot in 3-chome and I’m happy to have discovered it after many years of visiting the area. English menu so it’s an easy place for tourists to order in. ¥1000 seating charge.
Oh, Satodate-san told me with a smile that ‘ほうでなす’ is a bit of Tokhoku regional slang for ’ばかやろう!’

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6-6-4, Sakae Bldg B1, Akasaka, Minato-ku

The B Flat in Akasaka is a great straight-ahead jazz club in an area without many other options for good music. There is a healthy mix of acts on the schedule with both local and overseas groups playing in a variety of styles.

B-Flat is large, so spacious that it’s one of the few clubs in town that actually feels like it could be in New York. It’s a long rectangular space with the stage along the right side as you walk in. Look out for the brick wall behind the stage with the signatures of all the visiting musicians throughout the years.

There’s a substantial food and drinks menu so you can have dinner during the show but the best thing about B Flat is that unlike some other clubs in town that will remain nameless, once you enter you can stay for both of the evening’s sets. Highly recommened club. Keep an eye out for the owner, a real dandy gentleman who sits by the door chain smoking while cooly greeting customers. Good pics on the homepage.

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Gi
416 Imai Minami-Cho, Nakahara-Ku, Kawasaki-Shi

Gi is a tiny dining bar located just about 10 minutes walk from Musashi Kosugi station in Kawasaki. It first opened 15 years ago but current manager Jin-san has been running it for about 3 years now, with an expanded food & bar menu. There’s an occasional live gig once or twice a month but mostly just jazz CDs playing in the background. When I went in Jin-san had on Sonny Rollins’ ‘Way Out West’. There’s a rack by the back wall with a lot of CDs, mostly classic stuff on Blue Note and some old jump-blues/R&B type stuff.

Musashi Kosugi is not the most glamorous part of town but if you live along the Tokyu Toyoko line then it’s worth stopping off there to check out Gi, Muse or a couple of the other joints around the station. Gi opens right out into the street so is a nice place to sip a drink or two during the spring and summer. Great speakers in the bathroom!
Opens from 1730.

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1-19-11 B1F Shinjuku, Shinjuku-Ku

Jazz Tweeter was opened a couple of years ago by long-time hotel restaurant chef Ishizuka-san. He’s a real friendly guy that spent three years wandering Tokyo’s jazz joints, collecting information and learning before opening his own place. Obviously we hit it off and chatted immediately.

Being a chef, Ishizuka-san takes pride in his lunch menu (note:lunch not available on Saturdays). He also emphasized that he built the entire speaker system (as well as the bicycles and fishing equipment hanging on the walls)from scratch by himself. He takes pride in knowing audio equipment and the sound in the cafe is indeed amazing, with the volume just at the right level.

Tweeter is open on weekdays from 1130 and closes at 2330, operating as a local lunch spot, afternoon cafe and evening bar. Be sure to check out the extensive Blue Note collection on CD near the kitchen and the great collection of jazz photographs hung around the walls.

1−28−9, Shibuya, Yoyogi

Music Bar is part of the new development Yoyogi Village (read more about it here. It’s not purely a jazz bar though the night I dropped by they were playing Nina Simone and Jimmy Smith records on the phenomenal sound system.

It’s a bit of a fancy place with elegant decor, well-dressed staff (who raced over to stop me from taking any pictures or videos..ahem…) and expensive prices, more of an Azabu or Omotesando type joint than the dingy jazz bars this site usually profiles. The sound is truly incredible though and there’s an extensive vinyl collection against the wall at the end of the bar. As a spot for a late night drink or two it’s certainly atmospheric. Good date spot for music geeks.

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2-12-5-2F Kita-Koenji, Suginami-Ku
03-03339-621103-03339-6211

Nadja is a great little cafe in Koenji that stands out for its tasty lunch menu, especially the Malaysian style curry. Was busy the time I dropped by so need a return visit to chat with the owner and get the real lowdown, but Nadja is a great stop for lunch and coffee before a heavy music night in Koenji. Beginner jazz fans especially welcome!

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Ogawamachi 3-24, Kanda, Chiyoda-Ku
03-3259-005503-3259-0055

Jazz Olympus was opened by the very friendly Komatsu-san in 2009. It’s a sleek cafe/bar that is already well known in the area for it’s lunch-time menu (rare is the jazz cafe with good food!). Komatsu-san has a nice collection of about 4000 records and CDs in the place, with some beautiful album covers hanging on a few of the walls. His collection is mainly from the 50s and 60s but not exclusively, and he’ll play any genre of jazz depending on the time of day. When I was there on a sleepy, rainy Monday afternoon it was Anita O’Day coming out of the exquisite sounding speakers.

Komatsu-san also has record sharing and record release events at the cafe about once a month. There are flyers by the front door but don’t be afraid to ask him about them if you can’t read Japanese. Olympus is another great spot on the now plentiful Ochanomizu jazz joint map.
Non-smoking until 2pm.

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Wako Bldg 1F 1-62-4 Kanda Jimbocho Chiyoda-Ku
03-5283-711703-5283-7117

Closed 2015

Small Hours is a new cafe/bar located in the back streets between Ochanomizu, Jimbocho and Suidobashi stations. Owner Nihei-san opened it in June 2011 and has already established a loyal customer base. It’s a long, narrow space with a beautiful wooden counter bar that comfortably seats about 10 and a table for 4 or 5 in the front.

The friendly and chatty Nihei-san is not a typical jazz cafe owner as she is young and not a manic record collector. She plays sax and flute though and certainly knows the music. “Soul Station” by Hank Mobley was playing when I walked in the first time; that gets immediate respect. One of her goals with the cafe is to have a space for those non-“maniacs” to come hear the music but not feel intimidated by older, regular customers who can be a bit prickly about the music (and new fans.)

For either coffee or some drinks Small Hours has a completely relaxed vibe where anyone can feel welcome. There’s beer and a large whisky selection though closing time is 9pm so get here by 8 for an early nightcap.

2F 3-20-13 2F, Ogawamachi, Kanda, Chiyoda-Ku

Grauers is a new cafe/bar opened August, 2011. Owner Furusho Shinjiro is a long time jazz journalist in Tokyo whose major project in recent years was a massive documentation of the complete Riverside Jazz Records discography. This book and many others by Furusho-san and other jazz writers are in a cabinet in the cafe available for customers to poke through.

It’s a fair sized cafe with one counter area as you walk in and some non-smoking seats in the are to the back. There’s a lot of wine and fancy snacks on the menu and with the minimal decor I think it works better as a nighttime bar rather than an afternoon cafe.

The space is dominated by two huge speakers along the back wall. Furusho-san informed me these are not for sale to the general public and were acquired from a recording studio. The sound was exquisite. Overall, Grauers is a happy new addition to the Tokyo jazz scene.

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Nishi-shinjuku 1-4-20, Shinjuku-Ku

The Vagabond is a classic joint right next to the West Exit of Shinjuku station. I think the review from the Japan Times in 2002 pretty much says it all. Have a drink downstairs to start, then head up for some food when the live music starts. Lots of good pictures on the website.

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Cygnus is the sister club to Aries in Ueno but a bit more upscale. Live shows three times a night, almost always local vocalists. A bit heavy on the jazz standards for my tastes but always high quality and a popular spot in Ginza.

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Watanabe Bldg B2 Ginza 8-6-19

The Ribbon is what most people would think of when hearing the words “Ginza Jazz”. It’s a bar that features nightly live vocal jazz, serves up some gourmet snacks, and serves a lot of whiskey on the rocks. It’s sleek, expensive and very very “Ginza”.
B2, right side on the sign in the pic above. One look at the website will tell you all you need to know about this place.

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Tsuji Bldg B1, 3-14-12 Ueno, Taito-Ku

Every Swing is a small friendly club in the barren back streets east of Ueno Station. This is not an area full of music so it’s all the more welcome to have someplace representing the jazz army.

There is no set genre at Every Swing so expect to hear anything from West Indian steel drums to chanson here. Every Tuesday is the “Service” Jam Session night, open to all levels from beginner upwards. At only ¥1000 it’s a good deal as many jam sessions in Tokyo charge a lot more to join. The crowd here is usually a bit younger than many other jazz clubs, which is kind of nice. The usual drinks and light snacks are available, and check out some nice photos at their website here

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Makita Bldg B1, 2-4-8 Ueno, Taito-Ku

Aries is a very local jazz live-house in the back streets of Ueno. By “local” I mean both the artists and customers; Aries feels like a place that people walk from their homes to. It’s a small square room with all the seats facing the stage, which is on the left when you walk in.

The nightly schedule almost always features vocal-led groups but in a variety of genres, not just standards and lite-bossa covers. Jazz spots like this are totally authentic and completely unpretentious, just some local artists and regulars enjoying music and drinks.

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Higashi Shin Bldg , 4F, 3-21-7, Shinjuku, Shunjuku-Ku

Pearl Bar is a real sleek “grown up” jazz bar in the center of Shinjuku. Lots of cocktails, nightly piano & vocal/instrument duo live music, ‘romantic’ view out the long bar window. It’s a nice place to take your customers or a first date to. The music is fine, nothing to write home about. A quick look at the website is enough to tell you all about the place.

1-7-3 Honcho, Kichijoji

Funky is the upstairs “Bar” part of the Bar & Kitchen Funky. It’s a sleek, dark room with a beautiful bar and great food available from the restaurant downstairs. Don’t expect too much (if any..) “funky” music here though, it’s more of a late-night wind-down vibe, great spot to end a longer Kichijoji night at. Expensive so bring enough dough. Great pics in the gallery on their homepage.

Funky is part of the Mugi group, owners of Sometime Piano hall in Kichijoji and several other bars and eateries.

4 Chome−3−1, Higashinakano, Nakano

Neighborhood cafe/bar/small live club. This is the kind of place you really only find in Japan; intimate, friendly and wonderful. Live music most nights but it’s not really a “club”.

2 Chome−2−7, Asagayakita, Suginami

Tiny club in jazz rich Asagaya, Manhattan is always worth stopping by. All-night jam sessions three times a month.

Shin-Yuri Green Plaza B1, Hakusan 4-1-3 Aso-Ku, Kawasaki-Shi

Coming out the station go to Bus Stop #3, take the bus bound for Shin-Yuri Green Town. Get off at the 6th stop, Hakusan 4-Chome (白山4丁目)

Hotel Wing International Meguro B1, 1-3-14, Meguro

Blues Alley Japan. is a sophisticated club with great food and an eclectic live schedule. It’s basically what the Blue Note is trying to be but isn’t; a fancy place to take some customers, but where the business crowd does not overwhelm the music.

The website has a useful guide on their live calendar letting you know exactly what genre is being featured that night, anything from straight-ahead jazz to World or even lite-soul. Lots of good pictures of the interior on their site too. Reservations are recommended, and bring your credit card..

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Suehiro-Cho 2-5, Naka-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Yoidore Hakushaku (よいどれ伯爵-the name translates as “The Drunken Earl or The Drunken Count”, take your pick. Locals just call it “Yoidore”) is classic old basement joint in jazzy Kannai, Yokohama. It’s got a very vintage sense of style..I was reminded of my old neighbor Mrs. Bodenheimer’s s apartment in Brooklyn, which will make sense to some of you..Soft sofas around the room along side a bar, with the musicians up against the back wall. Owner Sato-san is usually behind the bar and up for a chat between sets, keeping the vibe very friendly (not always the case in live venues..)

It’s vocal groups almost every night at Yoidore; don’t go here expecting to hear any Pharoah Sanders covers. It’s great value for the usual 3000 yen entry as there are three sets nightly from 7:30. 10 bonus points for serving Guinness!

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Sumiyoshi-cho 6-7-6, Naka-Ku, Yokohama-Shi

Kamome means “seagull” in Japanese; it’s an apt name for a venue in the port town of Yokohama. It’s a great new-ish restaurant club in the historic but recently downtrodden Kannai neighborhood, not far from Chinatown or the baseball stadium. There’s live music every night with a really eclectic mix of styles..be sure to check the schedule (and have a Japanese reading friend confirm the genre of the evening) before going. The food is very good here and all the seats face the stage for the most part. The gigs usually end about 10pm so Kamome is a good first stop on a jazz-hopping evening in Kannai.

A reminder: there is no smoking inside many (not all) establishments in Kanagawa prefecture, to which Yokohama belongs. Certain bars still allow it but many places with food do not.

Annex Bldg. 4F, Ropoongi 4-11-5, Minato-Ku

Very supper-club type place, most nights featuring vocal-led bands. The food is good, the service rude and the prices are a bit high..so no, I’m not a big fan. Good place for business dinners & drinks though. The is the younger sister branch of the original Satin Doll in Kobe.

Numabukuro 1-34-4 B1, Nakano-Ku

Organ Jazz Club: the name gives it away, doesn’t it? One of the few places in town with a real Hammond Organ, this place is a must-visit if you like your jazz to be funky. Live gigs almost every night.

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2-24 Jimbocho Kanda, Chiyoda-Ku

Kissa Ko is one of the older cafes in town but had a facelift in 2012 so now has an all new decor. It’s in the is  back streets of Jimbocho in an Edo-style wooden house that seems to be one of those buildings that survived the war.The owners have kept some of the original furniture in the small second floor tatami-space, a very relaxing spot to linger in.

They specialize in gourmet coffee here and are open from 7:30am during the week for breakfast. The jazz is mostly standard stuff with some vocals, nothing too challenging but nothing too “lite” either. Kissa Ko is a great place to stop by after browsing the book shops in Jimbocho or even a late morning coffee before hitting the streets.

Inoue Bldg (井上ビル) B1, 5-16-15, Ogikubo, Suginami-Ku

Rooster is a great little live-house that features jazz, blues, funk, New Orleans..basically all the best stuff. They have a 2nd small space on the north side of the station too, for jam sessions and extra gigs.

Himawari Bldg. 2F, Dogenzaka 2-26-5, Shibuya-Ku

Very small place that is really just a bar with live music every night of the week. I’ve got it in the “Club” section because the vibe is more like a club than a bar where you can sit and chat while drinking; at KoKo the live music dominates the space. There are often jam sessions on Weds and Sundays.

Minami-Shinozaki-cho 3-2-12, 2F, Edogawa-Ku
03-3698-218603-3698-2186

European style cafe, heavy on female vocalists and piano jazz.

TN Koramu Bldg, 2-12-13, Kichijoji Honcho, Musashino-shi
0422-28-50350422-28-5035

Good Italian food at this restaurant/bar/club. The schedule on the website shows the genre of each night (vocal, fusion, Latin, etc) which is helpful if you are not familiar with the artists. Strings is a good way to start a jazz-bar crawl night in Kichijoji.

1-36-12 Yoyogi Shibuya

Sister-branch of Naru in Ochanomizu

Fujimi Yoshida Bldg. B1, Fujimi 2-2-11, Chiyoda

Cafe Ragtime has live music every Thursday and Friday nights, usually piano and sax or vocalist duos. It’s a friendly place, good to drop by if you are doing an Iidabashi & Kagurazaka afternoon walk.

Royal Mansion B1, Shinjuku 5-1-1, Shinjuku-Ku

Old basement club, lots of vocalists on the schedule. Mellow vibe and not too expensive.

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2-20-2 Kitazawa, Setagaya-Ku

NOTE: Masako closed in FEB 2010…I’m leaving it here anyways, so people will remember.

Masako in Shimo-Kitazawa is close to perfect, one of those places you could stay in for hours drinking coffee or beer, listening to one album after the next. As one of the oldest remaining jazz cafes in Tokyo it has a regal sort of atmosphere to it. When you walk in you come face-to-face with a large oil painting of Masako herself with the great Mal Waldron, a long-time visitor to Japan. A look further inside reveals a series of oil paintings on the walls, all of famous jazz musicians. What I liked even more were the old concert posters spread around the paintings, some from as far back as the 1950s.

No live music here, just 2000+ records and roughly the same amount of CDs. Lots of swing and 1950s and 60s albums in the collection, but even some fusion too. Requests are gladly accepted if they can find it in the cabinet. The seats and tables are low and the shop is kept fairly dark; like all the best jazz spots it’s a place for hard core fans who want to listen intently to the music and not work on their lap top or chat loudly to their friends.

There are two bookcases packed with old `Swing Journal` and `Jazz Review` magazines, fun to browse through even if you don`t read Japanese. I’ve learned a lot about jazz by browsing these magazines over the years, and still remember working my way through a long Japanese-language profile of Freddie Hubbard one day.

Masako passed on in 1984, and the place has been run since then by Fukushima-san. He said there weren’t as many regulars as there used to be, but every time I go there it’s packed so business seems good. (I’ve noticed again and again that jazz bar/cafe owners here often moan about the lack of customers compared to 30 years ago, yet their places are still open and usually at full capacity…. nostalgia for the old days perhaps?)

Masako is the oldest jazz cafe in Tokyo and second oldest in the whole Kanto area after Chigusa in Yokohama. Here’s hoping it stays open another 50 years.

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