Shibuya

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〒150-0002 Tokyo, Shibuya City, Shibuya, 1 Chome−5−6 B1F

INC Cocktails opened in late 2018 just a short walk from Shibuya Station. It’s a very large basement bar that will appeal to distinct kinds of customers: audiophiles, and liquor connoisseurs.

First about the audio system: INC has a set up of an ALTEC pre-amp, and power amp, one of the few places in town with such a system. (Read more about ALTEC amps here) In addition to the amps and speakers there are two ALTEC 612a speakers, totally vintage. Two GARRARD 401 turntables and a collection of about 2000+ records on the shelves al add up to an awesome listening experience. (I got to DJ there once and can vouch for the sound quality). The music ranges from jazz to soul to some pop, but always groovy and never too loud to make conversation impossible.

The liquor menu is the other main attraction at INC, with over 100+ bottles of vodka, gin, whiskey and liqueurs, plus a monthly menu of specialty original cocktails. There are even some bottled craft beers made specially for INC by their partner company in Okayama Prefecture.

INC is a large space with plenty of seats either at the bar or tables and booths, with the lighting kept low for maximum ambience. A rotating roster of DJs appear frequently and the bar is also available for private parties. INC is a welcome new joint for both music geeks and high-class bar aficionados alike. Open until 3am so INC is perfect as well for a nightcap away from the crowds of Shibuya.

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41-23 Udagawa-Cho, Shibuya-Ku 150-0044

Bar Bossa in Shibuya is a quiet gem of a place, perfect for bossa nova fans and/or couples looking for a dark & romantic spot to drink. It was opened in 1997 by owner/sole bartender Hayashi-san, a warm and mellow host who has been to Brazil several times over the years.

The bar is spacious with room for six at the counter and about 14 seats spread around some small tables. Hayashi-san keeps the music low and mellow; this is not the place for those looking for rowdy Brazilian samba and dancing. The wooden decor and warm colors are effective, as you relax immediately upon sitting down.

The drinks menu is impressive, featuring some Brazilian choices like Pirassununga51, Ypioca Ouro and of course Caipirinha, in addition to cognacs, whiskies and wine. Small and delicious snacks are available but with all the great food available on the back streets of Udagawa-Cho in Shibuya it’s easy to eat before or after stopping in Bar Bossa.

Bar Bossa has a nominal policy of not allowing in male customers by themselves as to prevent harassment of the female drinkers, but this can be waived if Hayashi-san knows you (and generally is not meant towards non-Japanese visitors, but rather drunken old Japanese men.) A few kind words explaining you read about Bar Bossa here or on his JJazz.Net blog page and Hayashi-san will surely let you in. For bossa nova fans or anyone just looking for a quiet, sophisticated place amidst the Shibuya craziness, Bar Bossa is heartily recommended.

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東京都渋谷区桜丘町 17-10

Music Bar 45 is a small 2nd floor joint located just a few minutes walk from the south exit of Shibuya Station, in the same neighborhood as well known spots like Mary Jane jazz cafe and funky jazz bar/live space The Room.  Opened in mid-2015 by twenty year record company veteran Takahashi-san, 45 is tiny gem of a spot catering to music fans with broad tastes.

The chatty and warm Takahashi-san keeps it simple: ‘I’ll play anything here’. In the generally over compartmentalized music scene in Japan where people often settle into only one genre, this is a refreshing attitude. Although there are not events every night, at least twice a week DJs will stop by to play variously themed events; well known spinners Yuichi Kumagai and Rafael Sebbag both have monthly nights at 45. Takahashi-san is very open to people doing their own DJ sessionsn so chat with him if you have an event you’d like to set up.

The space is fairly small, a rectangular room with one long bar counter and a big window on the right, letting in some welcome natural light to keep it from feeling claustrophobic. The bar menu has all the usual liquor and a fairly nice beer selection, with some daily snacks listed up on the board behind the counter.  Tokyo music fans are spoiled for choice when it comes to nice music bars to drink in, but thankfully 45 has made it past the always difficult first year of operations to build up some regular customers and establish itself as a welcome addition to the Shibuya music scene. Open from 7pm most nights, closed Sundays.

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16-4 Kamiyamacho, Shibuya, Tokyo

Despite its old-world cafe atmosphere, Swing only opened in 2014 and is one of the newer jazz spots in town. Owned by friendly trombone player Suzuki-san, it feels like a ‘classic’ place, with some vintage instruments and old 78rpm vinyl stacked on the shelves. Suzuki-san was quick to chat about music and the cafe itself, immediately making us feel at home.

Swing is fairly small, a square room that can hold about 20 people at the counter and the tables along the wall. There are occasional small live sets but mostly it’s a place for afternoon coffee, lunch or evening drinks. It’s an intimate but not at all intimidating place to relax in, so if you’re in Shibuya and need a jazz respite then I’d heartily recommend an afternoon at Swing. Word of mouth has it that they serve some of the best coffee in Tokyo.  See pics here at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

 

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Utagawacho 30-4, Shibuya-Ku
03-3463-284803-3463-2848

Pres Jazz Bar is located up near the end of “Center Gai” street in Shibuya, not the most likely spot for a jazz bar. Named after the great sax -man Lester Young, owner Iwasaki-san opened the place about twenty years ago when there were still some jazz cafes and bars next door (unfortunately all gone now).

The counter in Pres a U-shaped, with the seats a bit close together but still comfortable. The atmosphere is dark and serious, with the music at just the right volume. By far the most memorable thing about Pres are the murals painted on each side wall, large and very lifelike portraits of jazz greats, of course including ‘Pres’ Lester Young. They watch down over you while you drink and listen, like gods quietly observing their worshipers. It’s a unique feeling for sure. See more pictures of Pres over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

For a bar right in the middle of screaming teenage Tokyo, Pres is a wonderful oasis of good music and sophistication. Perfect spot for post dinner drinks.

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Fuji Shoji Bldg. 2F, Sakuragaoka 2-3, Shibuya-Ku

Many years back I found  Mary Jane by accident, as I had been  looking for the wonderfully named ‘Hardbop Cafe’ (sadly now closed). Discovering MJ has been open for 40+ years and that it has its own distinct rustic vibe was a nice consolation prize.

MJ serves food all day, unusual for a jazz kissaten, and the owner Matsuo-san seems to really like Scandanavian jazz so you`ll hear a lot of the Nordic ECM label players here. I asked why it was called Mary Jane and he said ‘it’s just a name’ with no smirk or wink, so I don’t think it’s a marijuana reference. (Matsuo-san is not the original owner however so he may not know.)

The room is square shaped with many flyers and jazz books spread around, a very relaxing space for coffee and the tasty cheese cake on the menu. It’s very near Shibuya station but on the much quieter South Exit side away from the manic crowds of shoppers, meaning it’s a good place for a pit stop if you’re stuck in Shibuya.

Check the web page for his current, extensive playlist of new cds.

Pics of Mary Jane over at Tokyo Jazz Joints.

 

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1-17-10 Dogenzaka, Shibuya-Ku

There’s a beautiful simplicity about JBS (Jazz,Blues,Soul). Owner Kobayashi-san has more than 11,000 records in his tiny cafe, with no other decor visable. Even in a nation filled with maniac collectors this is an impressive site. I’d never seen such a collection up close before so it was quite overwhelming on my first visit. A great Jack DeJohnette quintet album was on when I first dropped by, followed by tenor-sax man Gary Bartz, both original vinyl pressings of course.

It took a couple of visits to get Kobayashi-san to start chatting, he’s a quiet, seemingly very shy man in his late 50s with a knowledge of “Black Music” (as they say here in Japan for any African-American music, from blues & gospel to soul & hip-hop) that is astounding. He’s written frequently in magazines and journals about the history and sociological impact of Black Music on America and the world. Behind the bar I could see some of the books he had with titles like “African-American Slang Dictionary”, “Hip-Hop Beats” and “The Death of Rhythm & Blues” alongside all the jazz disk guides.

JBS is a place that is about one thing only, and that is music. When I go there I go alone with a couple hours to spare, just listening to one great album after another, with the occasional question for Kobayashi-san. Even more so than than most jazz cafes, JBS is a music library where for the price of a coffee you get access to an incredible collection. It’s a diamond in the loud, vulgar streets of Shibuya.

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〒150-0002 東京都渋谷区渋谷2丁目3−4
03-3499-189003-3499-1890

Seabird is a lovely old cafe next to Aoyama Gakuin University, between Shibuya and Omotesando stations. It’s been open for about 30 years and has a very homey vibe, cluttered but cozy. The menu has the old style Japanese cafe ‘morning sets’ (toast & coffee) and a small liquor selection.

The music is a mix of jazz styles but nothing too heavy, with small live/jam sessions on Fridays and Saturdays. Mr. and Mrs Toriumi (‘Tori’鳥 = bird, ‘Umi’ 海 = sea) are super friendly and generous (they invited me to join them for dinner in the cafe last time I dropped by) making Seabird the kind of place you want to be a regular at. Amongst all the over-priced, soulless cafes of Omotesando, Seabird really stands out for its warmth and authenticity.

Note: there are two entrances to Seabird.

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Shibuya-ku, Udagawacho 19-5

Koen-Dori Classics is a small performance space located underneath a church in the heart of Shibuya. It seats maybe 30 people max, with all seats facing the performance area (there’s no stage).

The lineup of events leans towards the experimental; fans of improvisational music and dance will love this place. It’s a unique spot right in the heart of commercial Shibuya madeness. There’s performances almost nightly but check the website for details; the space is available for private rental so if you have an event you’d like to hold this could be a great spot for it.

 

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Daihachi-Toto Bld. B1 15-19 Sakuragaoka-cho, Shibuyaku Tokyo, Japan 150-0031

The Room is one of Tokyo’s best clubs, if not THE best for fans of funky/groovy music. It’s home base for the Kyoto Jazz Massive and owners the Okino Brothers often DJ there, alongside DJ Kawasaki and Tokyo’s funkiest DJ, Kuroda Daisuke.

There are frequent live performances as well (very crowded) and the vibe is kept friendly and not at all elitist by manager Sato-san. The Room needs to be your first stop if funk and funky jazz is what you are looking for. Events almost every night so check the homepage; some may feature Latin/House/Hip-Hop DJs and not funky jazz.

1−28−9, Shibuya, Yoyogi

Music Bar is part of the new development Yoyogi Village (read more about it here. It’s not purely a jazz bar though the night I dropped by they were playing Nina Simone and Jimmy Smith records on the phenomenal sound system.

It’s a bit of a fancy place with elegant decor, well-dressed staff (who raced over to stop me from taking any pictures or videos..ahem…) and expensive prices, more of an Azabu or Omotesando type joint than the dingy jazz bars this site usually profiles. The sound is truly incredible though and there’s an extensive vinyl collection against the wall at the end of the bar. As a spot for a late night drink or two it’s certainly atmospheric. Good date spot for music geeks.

B1 26-6, Utagawa-cho, Shibuya-Ku

Modern jazz specialty shop, more than 8000 records on sale from the 50s & 60s. Been open since 1973.

1-36-12 Yoyogi Shibuya

Sister-branch of Naru in Ochanomizu

Jingumae, 3 Chome−5−2

Gekko Sabou (月光茶房 “moon-light-tea-chamber”, a wonderful name) is not a jazz cafe/bar in the traditional sense. I tend to have a rather broad view of what “jazz” is though, so any place that advertises itself as featuring “jazz, free music, improvised music, tribal & trad music, voice and singing” is going to be right up my alley. It is a small place with only ten seats at a long counter. It has been through several changes in design and outlook since it opened and now functions as a coffee and tea specialty cafe. The menu for both is extensive, but you have to read Japanese.

It’ s sleek and dark with a really nice collection of tea and coffee sets above the bar, and framed record sleeves all along the back wall. Owner Harada-san and a regular customer were in the process of changing the albums when I was there, with the new batch consisting entirely of French records. I didn’t catch the name of what was playing at the time but it was some really minimal, improvised electronic music which fit the atmosphere perfectly.

This is a quiet place, good for either an afternoon tea or a beer at night.

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Toyo Bldg. B1, 2-20-19 Yoyogi, Shibuya-Ku
03-3370-180103-3370-1801

Haikara-Tei is another Shinjuku jazz bar that somehow never popped up on my jazz radar after all these years in the neighborhood. A basement bar with a real American feel to it (is it the red brick or the Miller beer sign? not sure…), it’s a great place for some quiet drinking and record listening. The picture above pretty much says it all as you can see the bottles on offer, and the two huge hanging speakers (which were playing some crisp Art Pepper records when I dropped in one night).

“Haikara-Tei” in Japanese is a pun, the phonetic pronunciation of “High Collar” (think “white collar”) and “Tei” being a “place to stop by”. Thankfully there’s nothing pretentious or off-putting about this bar, and the record collection on the left as you walk in immediately told me that the owners were serious about the music. It’s more spacious than the average bar so it’s a good joint to head to if you want some personal space or got a group of rowdy jazz fans out for the night. The address is Shibuya-Ku but Shinjuku Station or JR Yoyogi are the closest stations.

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